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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
, in the strongest possible terms, the assassination in afghanistan today of president hamid karzai's half brother, ahmed wali karzai, seen as the most powerful man in southern afghanistan was shot in his own home in kandahar by a man he knew and trusted. mandy clark is in kandahar. >> reporter: ahmad wali karzai was rushed to this kandahar hospital but with multiple gunshot wounds there was no chance he would survive. outside in the street lay the body of the man who had gotten through a tight ring of security to gun him down. >> my younger brother was murdered in his house this morning. president hamid karzai announced. ahmed wali karzai was a tribal council leader and considered the most powerful man in southern afghanistan. the attack stunned the city that has been hit by a series of targeted assassinations. this is the place, headquarters in kandahar city. moments ago word of the shooting came through as the police chief was wrapping up his interview with us and he rushed out to take charge. general abdul raziq told us that security was improving in the city when his two cell phones lit up at
old and treating american soldiers in afghanistan. mandy clark will have his story. >> this is the captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with russ mitchell. >> mitchell: and good evening. nearly two months after her trial began the case of casey anthony is et is to be in the hands of the jury tomorrow. closing arguments took place today and anthony, a 25-year-old single mother accused of killing her two-year-old daughter three years ago could face the death penalty if convicted. cbs news "48 hours" mystery correspondent troy roberts has been covering the case and has the latest. >> reporter: for three years casey anthony has fought the notion that she killed her own child caylee. >> mama, papa. >> reporter: in 2008 caylee was a spirited two-year-old girl. then a missing person. and a murder victim. casey was her 22-year-old single mom who raised caylee with her grandparents cindy and george, all living together under one roof. but in june 2008 casey abruptly left home with caylee. the family did not see caylee for a month. >> i found out my gran
night between front line troops in afghanistan and the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral mike mullen who's visiting them this weekend. somewhat unbelievably, several u.s. troops said their major concern was not getting paid because of this budget fight in washington. in response, mullen was blunt. he said it would be devastating. well, today our pentagon correspondent jim miklaszewski followed up in an exclusive conversation with admiral mullen. >> reporter: brian, admiral mullen fully expected to talk to the soldiers and marines about the war here in afghanistan. not the one in washington. >> they weren't talking about afghanistan. they weren't talking about the fight they were in. this isn't surprising, but when you're deployed you want to make sure everything's okay at home. >> soldiers and marines in the middle of a war zone worrying about getting paid. >> they always worry about getting paid. they just sort of expect it to happen. >> reporter: you said that if, in fact, paychecks were held up, that many in the services would be devastated by missing a single paycheck
years of distinguishedservice. today was all about a moment in afghanistan when petry was severely wounded, shot in both legs, looking at a live grenade that could have hurt his fellow soldiers. abc's john donvan on what he did. >> reporter: above and beyond. that's where leroy petry went in may 2008, afghanistan, his seventh tour of duty. these pictures, from before he found out what he was made of. with the true sign of that today being in all the ceremony, a certain discomomrt at the attention. >> to be singled out is very humbling. >> reporter: perhaps, yes, for a kid who used to get into fights and who almost failed in high school, but out there, picked up a live enemy grenade to toss it away to save his comrades. it cost him his right hand, but he's alive, rare for medal of honor winners. but there's also this. leroy petry decided he's not done. and when he reenlisted, he took the oath with his right hand. his new one. john donvan, abc news, washington. >> and we want to honor him, too. >>> and, still ahead on "world news," one thing you may want to buy to help create america
to afghanistan, his 6th combat tour. >> i know it's his job and he will be proud of me and i'm proud of him. we can support each other. >> reporter: that's so very hard. in fort brag families, deployed parents often miss birthdays, prom nights, graduations. about one third of this county's 3200 high school graduates come from military families. but this was one milestone no one in uniform had to miss. this year come borrowland county broadcast a on-line commencement of their high school. so when porsha jackson got her diploma, her entire family watched including her proud stepfather 7100 miles away in afghanistan. >> i just want to congratulate you and tell you how proud i am of you and i love you. >> reporter: in at least nine states high schools have invited deployed parents to watch graduation live on-line. at last a milestone moment no one in the family had to miss. mark strassmann, cbs news, fayetteville, north carolina >> mitchell: that is the cbs evening news. later on cbs, 48 hours mystery. thank you for joining us this evening, i'm russ mitchell, cbs new york. i'll be back here tomo
died in iraq and afghanistan in tonight's making a difference report, we meet an exceptional group of women who have lost their husbands or fiances in those wars and have joined forces to help themselves heal and to embrace life. nbc's peter alexander has their story. >> reporter: they are fun-loving and fearless. a brave group of women with something else in common, too. they are all military widows. who lost their loved ones in iraq and afghanistan. taryn davis was 21 when her husband, michael, was killed by a roadside bomb in iraq in 2007. >> one of the last things i said to him was i love you more than life itself. >> reporter: living without michael is an everyday struggle. >> when i went out into the world i just felt like they didn't want to embrace who i was. which was a military widow. and in the back of my mind, i'm thinking, that title, it symbolizes my husband's sacrifice and my own. and if i can get through it, maybe one day it can signify my survival. >> reporter: to help her own healing, taryn began reaching out to other widows. but talking alone wasn't enough. soon,
from france tonight. >>> now, to afghanistan. we're getting an exclusive look inside that deadly attack, by terrorists at a luxury hotel in kabul. an american who was there, having dinner with his family hen it all unfolded, had his cam are in hand. and tonight, he shows abc's's nk schifrin, what he captured. >> reporter: it started as a serene tuesday night in kabul. ali omar, that's him there, filmed his family joking around. they sat outside the intercontinental hotel. >> by the poolside, having dinner. >> reporter: then, the shots started. first, in the distance. then, a little closer. and then, just as that police officer there, is walking away. >> they killed him. up close. after they hit him, they turned around, just started spraying. >> reporter: ali runs throughgh the dark. still filming. >> i said my prayers. if i die, i die. i'm watching the guy. he's just shooting in the crowd. i'm staring at him. if i can see him, he can see me. i ran and jumped the wall. there were about 16 of us on the other sid. >> reporter: they waited there. that's his father. that's his cousin. nobody
. >> mitchell: in afghanistan a suicide bombary tacked a police station in the southern city today killing at least 11 people including a child. the taliban was quick to claim responsibility. afghan forces took over security for the city earlier this month. security for the city earlier this month. we'll be back. low back pain. imagine living your life with less chronic osteoarthritis pain. imagine you, with less pain. cymbalta can help. cymbalta is a non-narcotic treatment that's fda-approved to manage chronic musculoskeletal pain. one pill a day, every day, can help reduce this pain. tell your doctor right away if your mood worsens, you have unusual changes in mood or behavior or thoughts of suicide. antidepressants can increase these in children, teens, and young adults. cymbalta is not approved for children under 18. people taking maois or thioridazine or with uncontrolled glaucoma should not take cymbalta. taking it with nsaid pain relievers, aspirin, or blood thinners may increase bleeding risk. severe liver problems, some fatal, were reported. signs include abdominal pain and yellow
to iraq and afghanistan before but never as defense secretary, that happened this weekend, he's only been on the job for 11 days and already those traveling with him say there's been an unmistakable change at the top at the pentagon. jim miklaszewski is traveling with him and tonight has an exclusive interview with the secretary. >> reporter: the new secretary of defense leon panetta surveyed iraq from a u.s. military helicopter today and was trou e troubled by the landscape below. troops scheduled to withdraw by the end of the are caught up again in the war. panetta told a gathering of soldiers today the killing must end. >> my first responsibility as secretary of defense is to make damned sure that we do everything necessary to protect you. >> reporter: panetta pressured iraq's top officials to send iraqi military officials out to hunter down attackers. in an interview with nbc news, he said if not, american combat forces would do the job. >> all i can tell you is i do have the authority and the responsibility to defend u.s. soldiers. >> reporter: this is panetta's second trip to visit
significantly. imagine this. half a world away in afghanistan, u.s. soldiers today, meeting with their chief, chairman of the joint chiefs mike mullen, asked, will we get paid? and he was forced to say, i simply don't know. but beyond that, america's international friends and, indeed, its friendemies, are concerned. they say, it is damaging. they call it irresponsible, what's happening in washington. especially china, which holds the most u.s. debtbt. it's calling for a resolution to this. and a key investment manager says to me, that the rest of the world is stunned, bewildered, more than a little worried. and that the damage has already being done. it's already more than a flesh wound. >> always fun to hear the word friendemy on the evening news. christiane, let me just pick up on the last thing you said there. do you really think that even if a deal is done and they beat the clock, that real damage has been done in a lasting way? >> well, look. this is what people there are saying. that the level of thth acrimony, the level of the paralysis, the partisanship here, has sent a discouraging
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)